News

2016

Matthew Will

Matthew Will and his team recently discovered the chemical circuits and mechanisms in the brain that separate food consumption from cravings. Knowing more about these mechanisms could help researchers develop drugs that reduce overeating.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Researchers investigating eating disorders often study chemical and neurological functions in the brain to discover clues to overeating. Understanding non-homeostatic eating — or eating that is driven more by palatability, habit and food cues — and how it works in the brain may help neuroscientists determine how to control cravings, maintain healthier weights and promote healthier lifestyles.

Heather Carver

A trilogy of one-woman plays, which started with a devastating diagnosis, led Dr. Heather Carver to understand the power of humor in supporting health.

Booby Hatch, a Hysterical Musicale premieres on March 2, 2016 at the Corner Playhouse, on the MU campus, in Columbia, MO. It is the third in a comedic, autobiographical trilogy about Carver’s experiences as a breast cancer patient and survivor of over ten years. 

Jeffrey Milyo

In the Netflix series House of Cards, protagonist Frank Underwood climbs from speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives to president using every dirty trick in the book, including murder. It’s a cynical view of life in our nation’s capital, yet it mirrors the growing public perception that politics and politicians are corrupt.

Dale Prouty

Jefferson City native Dale Prouty, BS, BS EE ’74, has been involved with more than 25 technology businesses during his career, but he believes his current company has the potential to change the world. Prouty is chief executive officer of Tri Alpha Energy (TAE), located in southern California, which is working to develop fusion-based electricity generation.

Bea Smith, Larry McMullen, Dudley and Beth McCarter

Bea Smith, former dean of the College of Environmental Sciences, poses with 2016 A&S honorees Larry McMullen, Dudley McCarter, and Beth McCarter at the 35th Annual A&S Banquet at the Reynolds Alumni Center.

The MU College of Arts and Science presented awards to two distinguished alumni of the college and to a dear friend and supporter of the college during the 2016 Arts and Science Banquet at the Reynolds Alumni Center, Feb. 19.  Larry McMullen, BA ’53 political science, JD ’59; and Beth McCarter, BA ’84 political science, were named Distinguished Alumni and were presented plaques for their contributions to the college and to the university.

lacretta ross

MU alumna Lacretta Ross will make her Broadway debut as Levora in DISASTER! Ross most recently was on tour with The Book of Mormon (Latter Day).  Select credits include: Regional: A Wrinkle in Time (Coterie Theatre), All Shook Up (FRP), Ragtime (PCS), Avenue Q (Barter). Opera: Carmen (Carmen), Gianni Schicchi (Zita). Television: “Law & Order: SVU,” “30 Rock.”

Using the stage name Lacretta Nicole, University of Missouri-Columbia alumna Lacretta Ross, BA Interdisciplinary Studies '03, has landed the role of Levora in the new Broadway musical comedy DISASTER!

Written by Seth Rudetsky and Jack Plotnick, the musical, which is currently in previews, blends disco with the popular disaster film genre of the 1970s. Ross will make her Broadway debut when DISASTER! opens at the Nederlander Theatre on March 8, 2016.

MU banner

A pair of professors, an academic adviser, and a graduate teaching assistant have been given Chalk Awards for excellence by the College of Arts and Science Student Council. Associate Professor of Russian Tim Langen and Associate Professor Soren Larsen of the Department of Geography each received the 2016 Arts and Science Purple Chalk Award for their excellence as faculty instructors.

Jeffrey D. Byrne

Governor Jay Nixon has appointed Jeffrey Byrne, BA ’83, to the Missouri Health and Educational Facilities Authority (MoHEFA). The seven-member board provides access to capital markets in an effort to lower the cost of health and educational services in Missouri by providing high-quality, readily available, low-cost financing alternatives for Missouri public and private, nonprofit health, and educational institutions.

Paola Savvidou

There are a lot of occupations that are inherently at risk for injuries, such as farming or firefighting or construction. But unless you are a musician, you probably don’t consider being a pianist a profession that entails much risk of injury. Paola Savvidou, an assistant professor of piano pedagogy at MU, says there is actually a very high risk of physical injury to pianists.

gray tree frog

Gray Treefrog (Hyla versicolor) – Credit: Brice Grunert

COLUMBIA, Mo. – According to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), 2015 was the hottest year on record. According to a University of Missouri researcher, increasing temperatures and climate variability might have an effect on the sounds produced by gray treefrogs.

sinquefield gift annc. 020116

Chancellor Hank Foley (left), and College of Arts and Science Dean Michael O'Brien applaud the announcement of a gift of more than $2 million from Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield to support the Mizzou New Music Initiative.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Dr. Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, residents of Westphalia, Mo., have given a gift of more than $2 million over three years to the University of Missouri to support the Mizzou New Music Initiative (MNMI). The MNMI brings together a diverse array of programs which position the MU School of Music as a leading national and international center in the areas of composition and new music. This latest gift will support the MNMI through 2019.

Brian Houston

Brian Houston is an associate professor of communication in the MU College of Arts and Science and co-director of the Disaster and Community Crisis Center.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Recent flooding in Missouri turned deadly and left many homes and businesses submerged in overflowing rivers. Hundreds of people were evacuated as many of their homes were under water. Often, children are the most vulnerable in natural disasters and require assistance and support long after they are affected.

selma march

The University of Missouri will celebrate Black History Month with a series of events throughout February. The month-long celebration, “Hallowed Grounds: Sites and Rites of Black Memory,” will feature events such as performances, lectures and panels. Some of the events include:

Tara Selly

Researchers who study evidence of predatory behavior in the fossil record generally look for drill holes, repair scars, bite marks, and other signs of predation in fossilized skeletons.  But a team of researchers at the University of Missouri has found fossil “snapshots” of predators caught in the act of feeding on their prey.

MURR header

COLUMBIA, Mo. – In the fight against cancer, nuclear medicine may be one of the best tools in a physician’s arsenal. Silvia Jurisson, a researcher at the University of Missouri, continues to develop breakthrough nuclear materials and methods used in the detection and treatment of cancer. She and her interdisciplinary team recently received a U.S.

Curators' Professor Kattesh Katti

Katti honored for breakthrough research in nanomedicine and green nanotechnology.

Kattesh Katti, Ph.D., Curators’ Professor of Radiology and Physics and Margaret Proctor Mulligan Distinguished Professor of Medical Research at the MU School of Medicine, was named the 2016 Person of the Year in Science by Vijayavani, the leading daily newspaper in the Indian state of Karnataka. Katti received this recognition for his breakthrough research in the fields of nanomedicine and green nanotechnology.

Noel Bartlow

Noel Bartlow, an assistant professor in the department of geological sciences, is interested in earthquakes that take a long time to occur. The focus of her research is slow slip events, or what are referred to as “slow earthquakes,” earthquakes that can last from a few days up to a year.

Hank Foley

The Academy of Science St. Louis has honored MU Chancellor Hank Foley with the 2016 Science Leadership award.

Since its inception, the Academy has promoted the recognition of the impressive scientists of St. Louis. This tradition continues with the 22nd Annual Outstanding St. Louis Scientists Awards. Each award-winner represents an extraordinary caliber of expertise.

James A. Birchler, Curators Professor of Biological Sciences

James A. Birchler, Curators Professor of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Science, has received a 2016 Fellows Award from the Academy of Science of St. Louis.

José Martínez

Mizzou graduate student José Martínez has been selected by Third Coast Percussion to take part in their Emerging Composers Partnership for the 2016-17 season.

The Chicago-based ensemble chose Martínez and Princeton graduate student Annika K. Socolofsky from among 99 applicants this year for the partnership program, which now is entering its third season.

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