cancer

A Targeted Approach to Fighting Cancer

Tue, 09/24/2019 - 9:09am -- yountj
Assistant Professor of Chemistry Heather Hennkens

Assistant Professor of Chemistry Heather Hennkens says the goal is to create a more efficient, fully functional pipeline for radiopharmaceutical development from campus laboratories all the way to the human bedside.

In the near future, a prostate cancer patient in Missouri may be injected with a radioisotope that can help imaging scanners accurately determine the precise location of a tumor. That diagnostic imagery could also help determine the targeting ability and exact therapeutic dose necessary to destroy the cancer cells without harming other tissues or organs in the body. A physician could then deliver to that patient a therapeutic radioisotope that is toxic to the cancer cells, without all of the physical side effects of treatments such as chemotherapy.

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chemistry
cancer
research
MURR
INMI

Patients Prefer to Have Cancer Screenings Despite Risks and Warnings, MU Researchers Find

Wed, 06/13/2018 - 10:12am -- yountj
Asst. Professor Laura Scherer

Laura Scherer and her team determined that patients may want cancer screenings even if the potential harms outweigh the benefits. Researchers believe that clinicians and oncologists could develop better communications tools and provide reassurance to their patients in better ways.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – A large proportion of the American public opts to receive cancer screenings with the hope that testing will reduce their chance of cancer death. Now, a team led by University of Missouri psychological science researchers has determined that patients may want cancer screenings even if the potential harms outweigh the benefits. Researchers believe that clinicians and oncologists could develop better communications tools and provide reassurance to their patients in better ways.

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cancer
pyschology
oncology

New MU School of Medicine Partnership with Indian Company Could Help Produce Holistic Medicine Treatments Aimed at Cancer, Arthritis, Diabetes

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 10:42am -- yountj
Kattesh Katti

Kattesh Katti and his team have developed a non-toxic delivery method using gold nanoparticles that may revolutionize Ayurveda. His technique for producing the nanoparticles recently was licensed by Dhanvantari Nano Ayushadi (DNA), a company base in Tamil Nadu, India.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Ayurvedic medicine (also called Ayurveda) is one of the world’s oldest medical systems. Originating in India more than 5,000 years ago, this holistic medicine system uses herbal compounds, special diets and other health care practices to augment conventional preventative and disease treatments. Now, Kattesh Katti, a researcher at the University of Missouri, has developed a non-toxic delivery method using gold nanoparticles that may revolutionize Ayurveda.

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physics
cancer
medicine
research
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