chemistry

A Targeted Approach to Fighting Cancer

Tue, 09/24/2019 - 9:09am -- yountj
Assistant Professor of Chemistry Heather Hennkens

Assistant Professor of Chemistry Heather Hennkens says the goal is to create a more efficient, fully functional pipeline for radiopharmaceutical development from campus laboratories all the way to the human bedside.

In the near future, a prostate cancer patient in Missouri may be injected with a radioisotope that can help imaging scanners accurately determine the precise location of a tumor. That diagnostic imagery could also help determine the targeting ability and exact therapeutic dose necessary to destroy the cancer cells without harming other tissues or organs in the body. A physician could then deliver to that patient a therapeutic radioisotope that is toxic to the cancer cells, without all of the physical side effects of treatments such as chemotherapy.

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chemistry
cancer
research
MURR
INMI

MU Team to Develop Research Pipeline for UM System

Tue, 09/03/2019 - 2:00pm -- yountj
INMI building

Professor of Radiology Jeff Smith and Chemistry Professor Silvia Jurisson chat outside the International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine (INMI), across the street from the MU Research Reactor (MURR). The INMI facility will provide critical infrastructure and collaborative expertise to researchers at all four University of Missouri campuses.

At the beginning of the school year, University of Missouri System President Mun Choi announced a series of investments in research and creative works that will help the system’s four universities achieve excellence through innovation. Many of those innovations will germinate and take root at the Institute of Nano and Molecular Innovations (INMI) building across the street from the MU Research Reactor (MURR) on the Mizzou campus.

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research
MURR
INMI
chemistry
University of Missouri System

Liquid Forensics Could Lead to Safer Drinking Water, MU Study Finds

Mon, 07/08/2019 - 2:45pm -- yountj
the instrument

The instrument is designed to analyze the quality of liquids using the photoacoustic effect, or the generation of sound waves after light is absorbed in a material. The MU scientists believe this might be the first use of this technology to analyze such small liquid samples.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture. Now, nearly 30 years later, a team of scientists at the University of Missouri is using this same sonar technology as inspiration to develop a rapid, inexpensive way to determine whether the drinking water is safe to consume. Based on their results, the scientists said they can determine changes in the physical properties of liquids.

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chemistry
water
lasers

DoD Awards Propel Research in Chemistry and Materials Science

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 9:43am -- yountj
new machine designed by A. Suits

This apparatus, designed by Prof. Suits and graduate student Chandika Amarasinghe and fabricated in the Department of Physics & Astronomy Machine Shop, allows his team to study collisions in molecular beams in vacuum. The beams are going almost the same direction so that the relative velocity between them can approach zero, like two cars moving the same direction on the highway. Reseachers can then take “pictures” of the scattering patterns when the collision happens. The team's current experiment uses four different powerful lasers to prepare the molecules in a single quantum state and then detect them after the collision.

 

The University of Missouri recently was awarded two highly coveted Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) awards from the Department of Defense (DoD), making MU one of only three higher education institutions in the nation to receive more than one award. The University of Washington and Massachusetts Institute of Technology also received two of the 24 MURI grants awarded this year from a pool of 295 proposals.

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chemistry
Department of Defense
molecules
machine learning

Fast and Efficient

Mon, 01/07/2019 - 1:22pm -- yountj
Professor of Chemistry Arthur Suits

Prof. Suits and his team found is that spin flips between magnetic and nonmagnetic forms can happen very efficiently in the course of a chemical reaction as the products separate after reaction if they are two “radicals”—molecules with at least one unpaired electron each.

An unexpected discovery in Professor Arthur Suits’ chemistry lab could have implications for manufacturing more efficient solar cells and improving photodynamic therapies for treating cancer, and it may contribute to research into quantum computing. At the heart of the discovery is the spin of electrons. Molecules are either nonmagnetic or magnetic depending on whether two electrons are paired with opposite spins or unpaired with same spins.

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electrons
spin flips
chemistry

MU Scientist and Inventor Advances the Study of Nanomedicine

Tue, 12/16/2014 - 12:00am -- yountj

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology, or the use of microscopic structures to diagnose, image, treat and prevent disease. Current problems in nanomedicine include understanding and anticipating the potentially toxic impact these nanostructures have on the body and the environment once they’re released.

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chemistry
radiopharmaceutical sciences
green nanotechnologyl
nanomedicine
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