News

2018

Professor Jeff Milyo

Annual Vehicle Stops Reports (VSRs) from the Missouri attorney general’s office have prompted heated discussions at Columbia, Missouri, city council meetings, community forums, and other venues for several years.

J. Chris Pires, Truman, and Nicole Monnier

J. Chris Pires, associate dean for research, and Nicole Monnier, associate dean for undergraduate studies, pose with Truman the Tiger at a recent Tiger Tailgate event in Kansas City.

Nicole Monnier, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies

 

Tiger Walk

Sunday, Aug. 19 features an all-campus pizza party and Tiger Walk, featuring freshmen walking through the Columns signifying their entrance into the university, followed by a reception complete with Tiger Stripe ice cream and a performance by Marching Mizzou and the Spirit Squad.

Students will return to the classroom at the University of Missouri on Aug. 20, but there are a host of events and activities planned for incoming and returning students before they ever crack open a textbook. Regular registration for the fall 2018 semester begins Monday, Aug. 13, and students can begin moving into MU residence halls on Wednesday, Aug. 15.

Devin Fergus, the Arvarh E. Strickland Distinguished Professor of History and Black Studies

Fergus’ new book, Land of the Fee: Hidden Costs and the Decline of the American Middle Class (Oxford University Press), traces the history of fees from the deregulation era of the 1970s to the present and explores the effect of increasing fees on growing inequality in the United States.

Each month when we receive bills for services such as cable television or cell phones, those bills typically include one or more fees that increase the total cost of the service, often above what is marketed to consumers as the basic price of that particular service. A new book by Devin Fergus, the Arvarh E.

Eichel Davis

If you’ve set foot in Taylor Stadium, Mizzou Arena or Memorial Stadium during the past two years, chances are you’ve likely experienced the magic of Eichel Davis’ storytelling. Mizzou Athletics’ unofficial “hype man” told the story of Mizzou’s athletic programs through powerful videos that often aired before games and have been viewed thousands of times on social media.

Marching Mizzou

University of Missouri Health Care will contribute $400,000 over the next four years to support the creation of the Marching Mizzou Scholarship Fund. The scholarships will help ensure that Marching Mizzou students have the necessary support to continue their educational and musical endeavors at MU.

NAVAIR visit

Alan van Nevel, head of research at the NAVAIR facility, Hani Salim and J. Chris Pires on a recent trip to NAVAIR's China Lake facility.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – University of Missouri administrators have signed an education partnership agreement with the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division of Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in China Lake, California, which will position Mizzou faculty, researchers and students to partner on advanced national security development efforts.

Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences John Huntley

Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences John Huntley has been named as one of two recipients of the 2018 Provost’s Outstanding Junior Faculty Research and Creative Activity Award.

Assistant Professor Elizabeth “Libby” King

Assistant Professor Elizabeth “Libby” King received the 2018 Provost’s Outstanding Junior Faculty Research and Creative Activity Award.

The award, which comes with a $1000 prize, recognizes exceptional research promise of an early career faculty member.

ACUE Summer Institute on Innovative Curricular Design

Eighteen faculty members participated in the ACUE Summer Institute on Innovative Curricular Design, studying MU’s undergraduate curriculum and exploring innovative ideas for enriching the learning experience.

A group of University of Missouri faculty from a variety of disciplines spent the first part of the summer rethinking curricula in ways that enhance student success.

Leslie Daggs, Olivia Wright, Jenny Dashner, and Kira Kirk

MU students Leslie Daggs, Olivia Wright, Jenny Dashner, and Kira Kirk tour the Callaway Nuclear Power Plant as part of Prof. Jerry Frank's "Acts of God: An Environmental History of Natural Disasters" history course.

MU communication major Olivia Wright walked the stage at the College of Arts and Science commencement this May even though she won’t officially graduate until August. Still needing a few credit hours to complete her degree, Wright enrolled in a two-week history course in late May called Acts of God: An Environmental History of Natural Disasters, taught by Associate Professor of History Jerry Frank.

jesse hall

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has selected MU and 32 other colleges and universities to join 24 schools selected in 2017 in its Inclusive Excellence initiative, which aims to catalyze schools’ efforts to engage all students in science ­­­─ regardless of background. Those students could include underrepresented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, or working adults with families.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – The Howard Hughes Medical Institute has selected the University of Missouri to receive a $1 million, five-year grant in support of the Inclusive Excellence initiative. As one of 33 colleges selected in 2018, Mizzou will contribute to the initiative by improving efforts to engage all students in science—regardless of their backgrounds.

Aaron Mencher, Douglas Osmun, Dustin Dunn, Gemma New

Student composers Aaron Mencher, Douglas Osmun, and Dustin Dunn pose with SLSO conductor Gemma New at Powell Hall in St. Louis. The symphony orchestra performed compositions by each student during a public concert in April.

Three student composers in the MU School of Music recently had an opportunity to have their compositions performed by an ensemble of world-class musicians. The performance at Powell Hall in St. Louis marked the culmination of a year-long collaboration between the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra (SLSO) and the Mizzou New Music Initiative (MNMI), funded by Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield and the Sinquefield Charitable Foundation.

Asst. Professor Laura Scherer

Laura Scherer and her team determined that patients may want cancer screenings even if the potential harms outweigh the benefits. Researchers believe that clinicians and oncologists could develop better communications tools and provide reassurance to their patients in better ways.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – A large proportion of the American public opts to receive cancer screenings with the hope that testing will reduce their chance of cancer death. Now, a team led by University of Missouri psychological science researchers has determined that patients may want cancer screenings even if the potential harms outweigh the benefits.

Elaine Lawless and Win Horner

Professor Emerita Elaine Lawless with her friend and mentor Win Horner. Lawless says Horner had a major impact at the University of Missouri and at Texas Christian University.

Professor Emerita Elaine Lawless is indefatigable. Having retired from the University of Missouri Department of English in 2015 with six books to her credit, Lawless has recently published two more books and has another scheduled to be released in 2019 by IU Press—a collection of her already published scholarly articles.

Prof. Giovanna Guidoboni

Prof. Giovanna Guidoboni says theoretical predictions made with the mathematical models her group has been developing in the context of glaucoma have recently been confirmed by an independent population-based study including nearly 10,000 subjects.

A mathematical model developed by a new faculty member at Mizzou could become a tool for early detection of vascular abnormalities of the eye. Professor Giovanna Guidoboni, who holds a joint appointment in electrical engineering, computer science, and mathematics, says her research began in 2010 while she was a professor of mathematical sciences at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI).

singh illustration

Honeycomb Structure

The left shows the atomic force micrograph, exhibiting honeycomb structure pattern behind a magnetic device. Inset shows the schematic of current flow direction. On the right: electrical data reveals diode-type behavior of current flowing in one direction. Inset shows that the dissipative power is of the order of nano-watt in the current flowing direction, which is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than the semiconductor diode. Credit: Deepak Singh

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Among the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and—in some cases—that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists led by Deepak K.

brain imaging

Dysfunction in a subcortical brain region, the striatum, which is associated with psychosis risk. Credit: John Kerns

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Psychotic disorders often are severe and involve extreme symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations in which people lose their sense of reality. Researchers at the University of Missouri recently found evidence that boosting how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially keep psychosis at bay.

Maggie Noble

Maggie Noble credits the digital storytelling program in the College of Arts and Science for helping her find her voice as a filmmaker and as an animator.

Maggie Noble says she can be a bit of a pest when she sets her sights on a goal, but her persistence landed her a job as a production assistant on a feature film that recently won the Jury Award for Best Narrative Feature at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival in Austin, Texas. That film, Thunder Road, written and directed by Jim Cummings, is having its international premier at the Cannes Film Festival in France this month.

Bob Priddy

Former Missourinet news Director Bob Priddy stands on the floor of the Missouri Senate, where he spent decades covering legislative debate for affiliated radio stations across Missouri. Priddy retired from the Missourinet in 2014 and now serves as president of the board of trustees of the State Historical Society of Missouri.

For 40 years, Missourians from St. Joseph to Joplin, from Kirksville to Cape Girardeau, could tune into to their local radio stations and hear the authoritative voice of Bob Priddy deliver the news of the day, with a focus on the workings of our state government in Jefferson City.

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