News

2015

Meera Chandrasekhar

Meera Chandrasekhar and her team developed a hands-on physics course for ninth graders designed to give them a better chance at being successful in higher-level high school and college-level science.

COLUMBIA, Mo. ­— Usually high school students take biology and chemistry before taking physics; yet, only 36 percent of students end up in physics courses, according to the American Institute of Physics. Meera Chandrasekhar, a professor of physics at the University of Missouri, received a $5 million multi-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to address this challenge.

treehopper

Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female.

Courtesy of Robert Oelman

University of Missouri biologist Rex Cocroft has spent much of his career listening closely to treehoppers. Discover what he found by clicking the following link:

http://www.npr.org/2015/08/27/432934935/good-vibrations-key-to-insect-co...

 

COLUMBIA, Mo. – More than 15 million Americans live within one mile of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations that combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to release natural gas from underground rock. Scientific studies still are inconclusive on the potential long-term effects on human development. Now, Susan C. Nagel and Christopher D.

Dr. Laura Scherer

Laura Scherer found a significant divide can exist between patients and physicians about the same terminology-- especially when it comes to discussing "pink eye," a particular flashpoint in childcare.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Few things are more stressful than dealing with a sick child. From discussing treatment with a pediatrician to complying with day care policies, a parent must consider many factors when making a decision about their child’s health.

COLUMBIA, Mo. ­— Today, the University of Missouri opened its doors for the fall semester, welcoming the largest student body and the fourth-largest freshman class in the history of the university. Among the highlights of the 2015-16 school year are a record number of high-achieving students — those students who scored a 30 or higher on the ACT — a record retention rate, and the most diverse student body in MU’s history.

Stephen Christ

After a day at work, you are in the mood for Mexican food, but you want something authentic—not the Americanized Tex-Mex food that’s ubiquitous throughout the Midwest. But how do you determine which restaurant offers the most authentic Mexican culinary experience?

In his book, David Geary recommends that by better assessing sex, age, and species specific vulnerabilities, future studies can assess whether biological traits are more sensitive to social stressors, disease and poor nutrition.

In his book, David Geary recommends that by better assessing sex, age, and species specific vulnerabilities, future studies can assess whether biological traits are more sensitive to social stressors, disease and poor nutrition.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Historically, males have been considered the vulnerable sex, sometimes called “male vulnerability.” Charles Darwin noted that boys are more likely to die in infancy than girls and have a higher risk of premature death throughout their lifetimes.

The MU Department of Theatre’s Center for Applied Theatre and Drama Research will play a crucial role in a study to determine whether an interactive theater intervention can improve adherence to lymphedema self-management regimens.

The throat fan of the Jamaican Gray lizard

The throat fan of the Jamaican Gray lizard (Anolis lineatopus) appears to glow when light passes through it from the back. The new study shows that this glowing effect increases the efficacy of the lizard’s visual signal by making the colors of the throat fan stand out against the background. (Photo credit: M. Leal)

See and be seen. In the elaborate game of seeking and attracting a mate, male anole lizards have a special trick—they grab attention by perching on a tree limb, bobbing their heads up and down, and extending a colorful throat fan, called a dewlap.

Drs. Mirela Milescu, Lorin Milescu, and Troy Zars were awarded a $300,000 BRAIN EAGER grant from the National Science Foundation.

Drs. Mirela Milescu, Lorin Milescu, and Troy Zars were awarded a $300,000 BRAIN EAGER grant from the National Science Foundation.

A new technology is heating up the neuroscience world.

Thermogenetics — the combination of regulated temperature and genetics — uses genetic engineering to deliver special temperature-activated proteins to specific neurons in brains of experimental animals. Then, researchers can apply a specific temperature to control these neurons, basically turning them on or off at will.

Mitchell S. McKinney, professor of political communication at the University of Missouri

Mitchell S. McKinney, professor of political communication at the University of Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. – On Thursday, August 6, the first Republican presidential primary debate was held in Cleveland, Ohio. Now, Mitchell S. McKinney, professor of political communication at the University of Missouri, and a nationally and internationally recognized scholar of presidential debates, offers his remarks on the debate.

Professor Christopher Otrok

Professor Christopher Otrok

MU Professor Chris Otrok, the Sam B. Cook Chair in Economics, wants to know what factors led to the Great Recession of 2007 and whether this information could help predict future financial crises. Otrok recently was awarded a three-year, $280,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to better understand the sources of financial crises and develop policy responses to those events.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Sam Hamra, a native of Springfield, Missouri, has given $100,000 to the University of Missouri to help fund the planning, design and construction of the proposed new School of Music building on the MU campus in honor of his wife, June.

Psychology Professor Bruce Bartholow

A few years ago a major brewery started selling cans of beer in the colors of various universities across the country. The so-called “fan can” was a hit with students but not with university administrators. More than two dozen university presidents sent a letter to the brewery asking it to stop promoting its product by using school colors, and the company agreed to cease the marketing campaign.

Mitchell S. McKinney, professor and chair of the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri, is an internationally recognized scholar of presidential debates.

On Thursday, August 6, the first Republican presidential primary debate will take place in Cleveland, Ohio and broadcast nationally by Fox News. This debate will offer the candidates their first opportunity before a national audience, and voters their first chance to assess the Republican candidates side by side as they seek their party’s 2016 presidential nomination.

Matthew Lee

Current research shows most young people tend to “mature out” of risky behaviors like drinking heavily as they transition into young adulthood. However, there is evidence that reductions in drinking in those with severe drinking problems may be especially pronounced when they get married.

Doctoral students and communication faculty from across the country take a break from the 2015 National Communication Association Doctoral Honors Seminar being held for the first time at MU. Students from 21 universities are participating in this year’s event in Columbia.

Thirty-four doctoral candidates from 21 universities are presenting their research projects to their peers and faculty mentors during the National Communication Association’s 2015 Doctoral Honors Seminar, being held for the first time at the University of Missouri.  The students were selected for the seminar based on papers they submitted. The theme of this year’s seminar is Solving Social Problems Through Communications Research.

Political Science Professor A. Cooper Drury

President Barak Obama says the Iranian nuclear agreement announced by the United States and its partners Tuesday is “a historic chance to pursue a safer and more secure world.” Speaking in the East Room of the White House yesterday, the president said the deal will ensure the Iranians will not produce a nuclear weapon for the next 15 years.

A. Cooper Drury, professor of political science, says he sees the agreement as the start of what could be a good path.

Jianlin Cheng, Jilong Li and Jie Hou recently developed RNAMiner, a website making it easier for scientists to analyze genomic data.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements.

Swallow Hall construction

People are used to seeing construction on the MU campus, from the erection of new student housing to the ever-expanding facilities at Memorial Stadium, but the ongoing construction project on the southeast corner of the Francis Quadrangle merits a second look. That’s because the reconstruction of Swallow Hall is not following the usual script—its interior structure is being built and then the exterior walls will be connected to the interior structure along the way.

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