Physics and Astronomy

The College of Arts and Science is proud to be home to some of the world’s best historians, scientists, artists, authors, performers, innovators, and scholars. The A&S Faculty Fellowship program allows the college to recognize outstanding faculty members by providing a one-time award of $5,000. The fellowship may be renewed if the faculty member is selected again.

The Faculty-Alumni Awards, begun in 1968, recognize the achievements of faculty and alumni. Faculty are considered for their work as teachers, administrators and researchers. Alumni are considered for their professional accomplishments and service to Mizzou.

2015 Distinguished Alumni Awards

The Arts and Science Distinguished Alumni Awards, established in 1984, allow the college to recognize some of its many outstanding alumni whose professional contributions have enhanced their respective disciplines and the quality of life for humankind, and in doing so have reflected well on the College of Arts and Science.


Major Garrett
BA ’84 political science, BJ ’84

Jacob Brown presents, "Nature of Optical-Faint Compact Radio Sources (OFCORS) - a progress report," Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 1:00 p.m. in Room 216, Physics Building.

physics bldg

Prof. Sergei Kopeikin presents, "Relativity and Fundamental Physics," Dec. 6, 1:00 - 1:50pm, Room 216, Physics Building.

physics bldg

Linda Godwin, MU professor of physics and astronomy, will discuss her experiences as a NASA astronaut on four space shuttle missions, beginning with deploying the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory on her first mission, the thrill of visiting the Russian Mir Space Station and the International Space Station on later missions, and what it is like to live and work in space.

WHAT: The MU Department of Physics and Astronomy will continue its monthly lecture series with a discussion on funding for astronomy. Eric Cropp, a student in the physics and political science departments in the College of Arts and Science, will present “Science is Going Green.”

Each time you drive your car, about one-third of the gasoline your engine burns is not used to propel the vehicle forward. Instead, that energy just goes out the exhaust pipe in the form of heat. In fact, MU Professor of Physics David Singh says about half of all of the energy consumed in the United States results in waste heat. Singh and his colleagues have been trying to find ways to harness that waste heat and convert it into electricity using thermoelectric materials.

One annual scholarship award of $500 shall be given to the graduate student majoring in physics with the highest qualifying exam (QE) for that academic year. Remaining funds shall be used to support graduate students majoring in physics. Support shall include fellowship awards, or travel awards to national and international meetings.

One or more annual awards to faculty, research associates or graduate students. Recipient will be designated as a "Chandrasekhar Fellow."

Awarded to students majoring in physics and astronomy, based on scientific promise and demonstrated scholastic excellence.

Condensed Matter – Biological Physics – Electrical and Computer Engineering

Ames National Lab

Yongxin Yao, Ames National Lab, will present, "Gutzwiller-Rotationally Invariant Slave-Boson Method and its Applications," Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 4:00 pm, Physics Library, Room 223A.

The MU Department of Physics and Astronomy presents the Condensed Matter – Biological Physics – Electrical and Computer Engineering seminar, "Possible Explanation for Cancer in Rats and Humans due to Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation," featuring Professor Bernard Feldman, University of Missouri-St. Louis.

UMSL Prof. Bernard Feldman

Associate Prof. Florent Perez, University of Paris VI, presents, "Spin-orbit twisted spin waves in magnetic quantum well," Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 4 p.m. Refreshments will be served beginning at 3:30 p.m.

Associate Prof. Florent Perez

Prof. Irene D’Amico, University of York, UK, presents, "DFT-inspired method to calculate work distribution and average work of a quantum many-body system," Thursday, Feb. 9 at 4 p.m. Refreshments will be served beginning at 3:30 p.m.

Professor Irene D'Amico

Ruthie Angelovici

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

Ruthie Angelovici

One or more annual awards to undergraduate students. The award may be renewed if the student maintains a minimum GPA of 3.0; financial need is not a consideration.

One or more annual awards to undergraduate or graduate students who have demonstrated a special interest in astronomy, physics, or mathematics, preferably in the field of astronomy. The scholarships shall be awarded primarily on the basis of demonstrated interest in astronomy and physics, scholastic promise, and the character of the recipients.

Awarded to junior or senior students majoring in physics or astronomy who demonstrate exceptional creativity and innovation.

Awarded to students majoring in physics and astronomy, based on scientific promise and demonstrated scholastic excellence.

This award provides travel support for graduate students to travel to conferences.

Gavin King, associate professor of physics, and Krishna Sigdel, a postdoctoral associate in King’s lab, received the Innovation Award from the Microscopy Society of America for developing the first three-dimensional microscope that allows scientists to study membrane proteins to see how they interact on the cellular level.

To celebrate 2016 Homecoming, the Mizzou Alumni Association will host the first Homecoming Hall of Fame Luncheon to honor the inaugural alumni inductees of the Mizzou Homecoming Hall of Fame. The inaugural inductees are Linda Godwin, David Novak and Kellen Winslow. The induction will be held from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 at the Reynolds Alumni Center (the event is sold out).

Linda Godwin

One or more annual awards to full-time undergraduate or graduate students who have shown exceptional promise in the study of physics.

An award in honor of Dan Danner for graduate students in the amount of $1,500.

Awarded to a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy who has made significant contributions to the undergraduate teaching program in physics.

OAK RIDGE, Tenn.—A group of 13 Ph.D. students from 3 partnering universities—the University of Missouri, Indiana University, and North Carolina State University—gathered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in April for an intensive course in how to apply neutron scattering to their studies of materials science and biological systems.

This month’s “Cosmic Conversations” will focus on how different cultures view the sky. In his lecture, “Connecting the Dots,” Nick Parmley, a graduate of the MU Department of Physics and Astronomy and a graduate student in the College of Education at MU, will discuss how various cultures incorporate constellations into their beliefs and philosophies.

This month’s “Cosmic Conversations” will focus on computer-based visualizations and simulations of deep space objects, with a presentation on several versions of computer desktop planetarium software that astronomy enthusiasts can use to study the universe without ever needing to leave the computer.

One or more annual scholarships to undergraduate students. Recipient must be a graduate of a high school in the United States or Puerto Rico, with a demonstrated financial need who is known to be a very hard worker. First preference shall be given to a graduate of a high school in Puerto Rico. Selection shall not be based upon scholastic achievement.

Kattesh Katti, Ph.D., Curators’ Professor of Radiology and Physics and Margaret Proctor Mulligan Distinguished Professor of Medical Research at the MU School of Medicine, was named the 2016 Person of the Year in Science by Vijayavani, the leading daily newspaper in the Indian state of Karnataka. Katti received this recognition for his breakthrough research in the fields of nanomedicine and green nanotechnology.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology, or the use of microscopic structures to diagnose, image, treat and prevent disease. Current problems in nanomedicine include understanding and anticipating the potentially toxic impact these nanostructures have on the body and the environment once they’re released.

Awarded to graduate students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy based on scientific promise and demonstrated scholastic excellence.

One or more annual awards shall be made to full-time student(s) enrolled as majors in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. The award shall be available to either undergraduate or graduate students. The objective of the fund is to help those students who have shown exceptional promise in the study of physics.

Prof. Anthony Caruso, University of Missouri-Kansas City, will present, "Counter High Power Microwave: Mechanism and Material Considerations," Monday, Nov. 7 at 4 p.m. in Room 120 of the Physics Buildng.

Prof. Anthony Caruso

Prof. Yaakov Friedman

Prof. Yaakov Friedman, Jerusalem College of Technology (Jerusalem, Israel), will present, “On the Influence of Energy on Spacetime,” Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 4 p.m. inthe Physics Building Library.

Prof. Gang Cao, University of Colorado, Boulder, will present, "Age of Oxides: New Physics and Foundations of Modern Technology," Monday, Nov. 14 at 4:00 p.m. in Room 120, Physics Building.

Prof. Gang Cao

Asst. Prof. Martin B. Ulmschneider, Johns Hopkins University

Asst. Prof. Martin B. Ulmschneider, Johns Hopkins University presents: "Validating Atomic Detail Peptide Partitioning Simulations Using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy."

Dr. Ken Herwig

Dr. Ken Herwig, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will present, "Prospects for a Second Target Station at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source," Monday, Dec. 5 at 4:00 pm, 120 Physics Building.

Dr. Yicheng Guo, University of California – Santa Cruz presents, "What Giant Star-forming Clumps Tell Us About the Assembly Histories of Galaxies." Studies of galaxy formation and evolution have made remarkable progress in the past two decades.

Dr. Vivian U, University of CA – Riverside/Irvine presents, "Gas Flows: from Black Holes to Galaxies," Monday, Feb 6 at 4 p.m.

Dr. Vivian U

Prof. Daniel Jacobs, Arizona State University, presents, "HERA: the Next Generation 21cm Reionization Array," Thursday, Feb. 16, Room 126, Physics Building. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m. in 223A Physics Library,

Prof. Daniel Jacobs, ASU

Patrick Kelly, University of CA - Berkeley, presents, "Using Galaxy Cluster Lenses as Extreme Probes," Monday, Feb. 13 at 4:00 p.m. in Room 120, Physics Building. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m., Rm 223A.

crabmosaic

Prof. David Mandrus, University of Tennessee, presents, "Designing Emergent Matter: How Physicists Think about New Materials," Monday, Feb. 27 at 4 p.m. in Room 120, Physics Building. Refreshments will be served at 3:30pm, Rm 223A.

Prof. David Mandrus, University of Tennessee

Awarded to graduate students.

One or more annual awards to full-time undergraduate students. The objective of the fund is to help "worthy" students; not necessarily poverty-stricken students or those with an unusually high I.Q., but those competent students who are seriously trying to gain an understanding of their subject and who might otherwise have difficulty in financing their education.

The College of Arts and Science is proud of its outstanding faculty members. They continue to make research breakthroughs and generate new knowledge, and Paul Miceli, professor of physics, is a prime example.

Deborah Hanuscin, Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the MU College of Education and College of Arts and Sciences, was named the 2014 Outstanding Science Teacher Educator of the Year by the Association for Science Teacher Education. To learn more about her work and dedication to teaching teachers, read the article published in Illuminations.

One or more annual scholarships to undergraduate or graduate students.

One or more annual awards to an undergraduate student who is interested in astronomy. Criteria for selection of the recipient shall be academic achievement and promise.

Jefferson City native Dale Prouty, BS, BS EE ’74, has been involved with more than 25 technology businesses during his career, but he believes his current company has the potential to change the world. Prouty is chief executive officer of Tri Alpha Energy (TAE), located in southern California, which is working to develop fusion-based electricity generation.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Three faculty members from the University of Missouri have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). They join 168 other distinguished scientists who have been awarded this honor this year.

COLUMBIA, Mo. ­— Usually high school students take biology and chemistry before taking physics; yet, only 36 percent of students end up in physics courses, according to the American Institute of Physics. Meera Chandrasekhar, a professor of physics at the University of Missouri, received a $5 million multi-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to address this challenge.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Meera Chandrasekhar, Curators Teaching Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Missouri, has been named the recipient of the Baylor University Robert Foster Cherry Award for Great Teaching. The $250,000 Cherry Award is the only national teaching award presented by a college or university to an individual for exceptional teaching.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – University of Missouri System Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, Research and Economic Development Hank Foley today awarded the first of ten UM System President’s Awards to be presented to faculty in 2015 to Gavin King, associate professor of physics and biochemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia.  

As computers, cell phones, and other electronic devices become ubiquitous throughout most of the developed world, there are growing concerns about electronic waste. The City of Columbia and the University of Missouri occasionally hold e-waste collection days, allowing people to dispose of their old computers, cell phones, or other electronic gadgets. Some of the materials are recycled, but the rest eventually will end up in a landfill somewhere.

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