Philosophy

Eduard MacheryEdouard Machery

Distinguished Professor in Department of History and Philosophy of Science
Director of the Center for Philosophy of Science
University of Pittsburgh

Professors, teaching assistants, and student advisers at the University of Missouri often receive accolades for their work—from their school or college, from campus administration, or from the university system. Instructors and advisers in the College of Arts and Science consistently say the award that means the most to them is the one from students—the Chalk Awards, presented by the College of Arts and Science Student Council each semester.

The College of Arts and Science is proud to be home to some of the world’s best historians, scientists, artists, authors, performers, innovators, and scholars. The A&S Faculty Fellowship program allows the college to recognize outstanding faculty members by providing a one-time award of $5,000. The fellowship may be renewed if the faculty member is selected again.

The College of Arts and Science Student Council honored two professors and an academic adviser with Chalk Awards for the fall 2017 semester. The student council solicits nominations from students for their favorite instructors and advisers, and the council’s executive committee makes the final selections. The student council will present plaques to the latest Chalk Award winners during its trivia night contest in Stotler Lounge in Memorial Union, Nov. 16.

2015 Distinguished Alumni Awards

The Arts and Science Distinguished Alumni Awards, established in 1984, allow the college to recognize some of its many outstanding alumni whose professional contributions have enhanced their respective disciplines and the quality of life for humankind, and in doing so have reflected well on the College of Arts and Science.


Major Garrett
BA ’84 political science, BJ ’84

Every day, people are faced with countless decisions—paper or plastic, steak or chicken—the options can seem endless. Paul Weirich, Curators’ Professor of Philosophy, just published a new book that explains how individuals can simplify and streamline their choices. The book is called Models of Decision-making: Simplifying Choices.

The department will make two $1000 awards each year if there are candidates of sufficient merit. To be eligible, a student must be an MU philosophy major with sophomore or junior standing. Every such student is eligible, but some preference will be given to students who have not received the award before.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – When making difficult decisions, people tend to become preoccupied with the many factors that make up the choice, often prolonging the time it takes to come to a conclusion.

Spring 2018
12:00-1:30 pm
S110 Memorial Union
(unless otherwise noted)

Spring 2018
12:00-1:30 pm
S110 Memorial Union
(unless otherwise noted)

Spring 2018
12:00-1:30 pm
S110 Memorial Union

Spring 2018
12:00-1:30 pm
S110 Memorial Union

Spring 2018
12:00-1:30 pm
S110 Memorial Union

Robert Richards

March 19: Robert Richards, the Morris Fishbein Distinguished Service Professor of the History of Science and Medicine, the University of Chicago, presents, "Darwin's Moral Theory."

The Evolution and Social Science Seminar Series continues on Monday, November 6, with a lecture by Associate Professor Chris Stephens, University of British Columbia, on the evolution of rationality. All talks are from 12:00–1:30 pm in S110 Memorial Union, unless otherwise noted. Talks run about 50 minutes with the remaining time for Q&A.

Everyone is welcome!

Kevin J.S. Zollman

The Evolution and Social Sciences Seminar presents, Kevin Zollman, associate professor, Department of Philosophy, Carnegie Mellon University, "Signals without Teleology," Monday, April 15, in Rm. 572, Bond Life Sciences Center.

Anyone who has seen an episode of Law & Order knows that if the defense attorney can successfully portray his client as a victim, jurors may be less inclined to assign blame to the defendant or may reduce the severity of the defendant’s punishment. Research confirms this is more than just a television trope—casting the perpetrator of a transgression as a victim tends to make them seem less blameworthy.

Asst. Prof. Kenny BoyceTraditional theists maintain that God alone is self-existent and that all things distinct from God depend on God for their existence. Contemporary platonists maintain that there is an infinity of necessarily existing abstract objects (such as numbers, properties, and propositions).

Many of us fondly remember reading adventure stories when we were young, such as Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island or Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. We would defy our parents’ admonition to “Go to sleep!” and hide under the covers with our book and a flashlight and race through the pulse-pounding narrative until we could no longer keep our eyes open. The book’s illustrations flooded our dreams, and we awoke in the morning eager to pick up where we left off.

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