Small Grant Program

The purpose of the PEHC Small Grant Program is to expand use of Census RDC data by providing seed money for projects that use confidential data accessed through the MU Research Data Center (MU RDC) and in doing so, to position the awardees to apply for external funding for full-scale projects. Permission to access data through the MU RDC will only be granted after a research proposal is reviewed and approved by the U.S Census Center for Economic Studies; this proposal requires a detailed research plan and as well as plans for meeting other requirements. The Small Grants Program is designed to cover costs associated with preparing such a proposal as well as undertaking research.

The PEHC Small Grant awards funds for projects over a 24 month period. The amount of PEHC Small Grants will vary, but most awards will range from $10,000 to $15,000. Funds may be spent on necessary research expenses, such as faculty salary, graduate student research assistance, data acquisition costs, etc.

Eligibility

All University of Missouri research faculty and staff without prior experience working with RDC data may submit applications. Only one application per project or faculty member will be accepted, but more than one faculty member may apply as co-PIs on a single project.

Small Grants will be awarded on a spring and fall cycle.

How to Apply

The grant application requires a short project description, indicating the importance of RDC confidential data for the project and identifying external funding targets, a budget, a project timeline, and CV of all investigators.

For more information on the application process please contact  muprovostpehc@missouri.edu.

Past Awards

The PEHC makes two rounds of grant awards per year. The following are a few of the Small Grant awards the PEHC has made so far to support RDC research:

December 2014

Stephanie Potochnick (Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs) and Jen-Hao Chen (Health Sciences) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project entitled “The effect of local anti-immigrant policies on immigrant families’ well-being.” This project will use county and city level data from the Current Population Survey and a difference-in-difference research design to assess the impact that local policies, such as the 287(g), have on immigrant well-being. The project will provide new information about how policy at the local, rather than state level, affects immigrants, and clarify how to examine other anti-immigrant policies (e.g., English only laws, business participation in E-verify) using different confidential RDC data sources.

Peter Klein was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for his project entitled “Analyzing Organizational Relatedness using Establishment Data.” This project will use the Longitudinal Business Database and other Census economic datasets to investigate the optimal scope of for-profit firms and whether a firm should specialize in a narrow set of activities or diversify into a broader set of roles, functions, and actions.

May 2015

Irma Arteaga (Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs) and Gustavo Carlo (Center for Family and Policy Research Director) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project entitled “Does Head Start prepare children in Missouri to succeed in the early elementary grades? Differential effects by ethnicity.” This project will use newly available Head Start data for Missouri and data from the MU RDC to match Head Start children with a comparison group on neighborhood characteristics at time of birth. The analysis will examine how Head Start participation affects child well-being and its differential impacts by ethnicity.

Jane McElroy and Robin Kruse (Family and Community Medicine) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project entitled “Geographic distribution of sexual and gender minority (SGM) population and comparison of SGM subgroups on prevalence of chronic diseases and screening behaviors by geographic location.” This project will use National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) restricted variables that are available at the MU RDC to 1) describe the geographic distribution of the SGM population and 2) compare the prevalence across geographic locations of common chronic conditions and screening behaviors among SGM.

December 2015

Kuntara Pukthuanthong (Trulaske College of Business) was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for project titled “Foreign exchange exposure, market integration and stock returns of exporters and importers.” This project will use the import and export data from the Longitudinal Firm Trade Transactions Database to estimate the effect of firms’ foreign exchange exposure on firm performance.

Emily Leary, Chelsea Deroche, and Iris Zachary (School of Medicine) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project titled “Utilization and Disparities in Mental Health.” This project used the National Health Interview Survey linked to the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey to investigate how demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic indicators influence access to care and utilization of mental health care.

Chelsea Deroche, Emily Leary, and Iris Zachary (School of Medicine) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project titled “Mental health disorders and comorbid conditions in adolescents and adults.” This project used the National Health Interview Survey linked to the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey identify and compare the association of comorbid conditions by mental health status in adolescent and adults.

December 2016

Claire Altman (Truman School of Public Affairs and School of Health Professions) was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for her project titled “Legal Status and Health Disparities Among Mexican and Central American Immigrant Young Adults.” This project will use the National Health Interview Survey to study immigrants from Central America and the effect of legal status on various health outcomes.

Nancy Cheak-Zamora and Chinedum Ojinnaka (School of Health Professions) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project titled “Disparities in Access and Utilization in Healthcare Services for Children with and without Special Healthcare Needs and their Caregivers: Does Physician Supply Play a Role?” This project will use the National Health Interview Survey to assess the association between pediatrician availability, and healthcare utilization and access for CSHCN, compared to other children as well as how the complexity of a child’s condition affects this association. In addition, they will analyze the association between PCP availability and utilization and access for caregivers, adjusting for their child’s special healthcare need status.

Lincoln Sheets (School of Medicine) and Chris Barnett (Center for Applied Research and Environmental Systems) were awarded a PEHC Small Grant for their project titled “Persistence of Personal Neighborhood Deprivation through Geographic Relocations.” This project aims to link the American Community Survey with the Decennial Census to study the document economic mobility and the persistence of socioeconomic status over time.

May 2017

Hua Qin (Rural Sociology) was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for his project titled “Rural Migration and Economic Inequality in the Ozarks.” This project plans to use the American Community Survey to answer: (1) how rural migration and economic inequality in the Ozarks changed before, during and after the Great Recession? And (2) what is the association between migration and economic inequality in this region during the study period of 2000–2015.

December 2017

Eileen Avery (Department of Sociology) was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for her project titled “Income Inequality and Health in Metropolitan Context: Expanding the Debate.” This project will use the National Health and Nutirtion Examination Survey to study how income inequality at the metropolitan and neighborhood levels is associated with self-rated health, depressive symptoms, sleep quality, and weight status.

Nicole Jones (Department of Sociology) was awarded PEHC Small Grant for her project titled “Locational Attainment and Residential Segregation of Foreign-Born and Native-Born Blacks.” This project will use the Decennial Census and the American Community Survey to examine black residential patterns by various groups over time.

Mansoo Yu (School of Social Work) was awarded a PEHC Small Grant for his project titled “Racial and Ethnic Differences in Correlates of U. S. Adolescent Substance Use: Do Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Matter?” This project will use the National Youth Fitness Survey, which is a supplement to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, to study the relationship between inter/intrapersonal factors, healthy eating and physical activity, and substance use.